Sunday, 7 April 2013

Drawn to Grace.

Michael Whynot. Figure Study, 2013. Red chalk.


Michael Whynot. Figure Study, 2013. Red chalk.


Michael Whynot. Figure Study, 2013. Red chalk.

Michael Whynot. Figure Study, 2013. Red chalk.



Michael Whynot. Figure Study, 2013. Red chalk.





She Walks in Beauty

                                                                         BY LORD BYRON (GEORGE GORDON)
She walks in beauty, like the night
   Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that’s best of dark and bright
   Meet in her aspect and her eyes;


    I know grace when I see it. Defining grace, however, is somewhat more difficult, although Merriam-Webster defines it, at least for our purposes, as: ease and suppleness of movement or bearing...

    Ease and suppleness of movement or bearing. As I stated, above, I know it when I see it, but explaining why, exactly, one person has it, while another does not, eludes me. Grace can mean the difference between an adequate drawing and a great drawing. Grace of form has the power to inspire us and can elevate our drawing with its mere presence.

    I yearn for this trait in the models I draw. I believe that, for the most part, models may not understand this trait or even recognize it in themselves. Grace is something which comes naturally and I am uncertain whether it can be nurtured or not.

    I believe that Lord Byron was describing grace in his beautiful poem:

                                                She walks in beauty, like the night
   Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that’s best of dark and bright
   Meet in her aspect and her eyes;
    
    Meet in her aspect and her eyes. If we, as draftsmen, can but capture this elusive aspect in our drawings, they will be, unquestionably, the better for it. But seeing grace is the precursor to drawing grace. So, perhaps, grace must be present in both artist and model. Perhaps grace is what we, as artist, see.